Tuesday Jun 18, 2024
Snoz!
w/ Boob Radley | Kello Hitty
Thursday Jun 20, 2024
Janie Danger & the Wifesuckers
w/ Buice | Big Yellow | We Are Damselflys
Friday Jun 21, 2024
TWINS / That Which Is Not Said
w/ Nelward | Pinkest | 24Hr Lesbian Date
Saturday Jun 22, 2024
Wieuca (album release)
w/ Psychic Death | A Blue Room
Monday Jun 24, 2024
Gull
w/ Spacers | Slick | Gilmore Teusink
Tuesday Jun 25, 2024
Exile
Sirplus
w/ OG DosEquis | DJ Pocket | JP Villa
Wednesday Jun 26, 2024
Dive Star
w/ Equal Creatures | Tongues of Fire | Sleep Number
Thursday Jun 27, 2024
Lakim
w/ Jovan El Feo | Von Phoenix | Mila Killa | JSPORT
Friday Jun 28, 2024
all under heaven
w/ Hubble | Coma Therapy | Why Girls Kill
Saturday Jun 29, 2024
Veil & Whom? present HYPNOTIQ
Tuesday Jul 02, 2024
Leah Senior
Wednesday Jul 03, 2024
Rui Gabriel
w/ O Key | Bizner
Thursday Jul 04, 2024
Soul Blind
w/ Askysoblack | Dime | Zija | Plasticine
Saturday Jul 06, 2024
Tim Cappello (The Lost Boys)
TEMPLE OF LOVE
Tuesday Jul 09, 2024
Scare Quotes (Last Show)
Floral Print (Last Show)
w/ Truth Club | Psaltery | Plastique
Wednesday Jul 10, 2024
Halloween
w/ Mood Room | Scor | Ritual Day
Thursday Jul 11, 2024
Cinema Stare
w/ zl!ster | Indelicate
Friday Jul 12, 2024
Cola
w/ Devon Welsh | Lorie
Saturday Jul 13, 2024
Breathers
w/ Suede Cassidy | Revival Season | TAYLOR ALXNDR
Tuesday Jul 16, 2024
Imp
w/ Rogue Dynamo | Victor Mariachi | freespottie & Ill Kalil | DJ Throwback Soul | Automatic Bazooti
Thursday Jul 18, 2024
William Crooks
w/ TYGKO | Garbage for Lust | LAMB13
Saturday Jul 20, 2024
Dinner Time
w/ Rujen | Buko Boys | Cannibal Kids
Tuesday Jul 23, 2024
Previous Indistries
Wednesday Jul 24, 2024
Secret Towns “Summerland” Album Release
w/ Kelly Romo | Lorenzo & Co | John Burns
Thursday Jul 25, 2024
Dillon
w/ J. Rawls | Lunden Benard | Headkrack | Hosted by Fort Knox w/ DJ Kerosene
Friday Jul 26, 2024
The Folk Implosion
w/ Lou Barlow | John Davis
Saturday Jul 27, 2024
The Pierres
w/ Nicholas Mallis and the Borealis | Mom Friend | Buckhead Shaman
Monday Jul 29, 2024
The Body
Dis Fig
w/ Cel Genesis
Friday Aug 02, 2024
Juan Wauters
Wednesday Aug 07, 2024
Layzi
Thursday Aug 08, 2024
TC Superstar
Friday Aug 23, 2024
J.R.C.G.
w/ Mother’s Milk | Night Cleaner
Monday Sep 09, 2024
Sour Widows
Youbet
w/ Mallbangs
Friday Sep 20, 2024
Tinzo + Jojo
Saturday Sep 21, 2024
Alingon Mitra
Tuesday Oct 01, 2024
Brothertiger
Friday Oct 04, 2024
Fake Fruit
w/ Spllit
Saturday Oct 05, 2024
Boulevards
Wednesday Oct 09, 2024
ULTRA SUNN
Monday Oct 21, 2024
French Police
w/ Wisteria
Monday Oct 28, 2024
Uz Jsme Doma
529Logo_1022-1
Friday Jul 26, 2024
18+ | 8:00 pm | $30
529 & Speakeasy Promotions & Nobody’s Booking Presents:

The Folk Implosion

Lou Barlow | John Davis

The Folk Implosion

“How the fuck are we going to turn this into a song?” That’s the question Lou Barlow and John Davis have asked themselves since co-founding the Folk Implosion in the early 1990s. Beginning with improvised jams featuring Barlow on bass and Davis on drums, the duo develop their beat-driven pop collages from the ground up. It’s the process they used on their debut cassette, Walk Through This World with the Folk Implosion, and one they’ve returned to 30 years later on their spellbinding, self-referencing reunion, Walk Thru Me.Separated from their homes in Massachusetts and North Carolina, Barlow and Davis collaborated remotely, flashing back to their early friendship as penpals. A sweaty bass and drums session went down in Barlow’s attic, before they booked studio time with producer Scott Salter (St. Vincent, Spoon, The Mountain Goats). 

Contrasts and comparisons are the keys to unlocking Walk Thru Me, and the Folk Implosion as a whole. Beyond the audible differences between Barlow’s soft voice and Davis’s urgent, reedy proclamations, their approaches to songwriting are strikingly distinct. While Barlow approached his lyrics from a protective paternal perspective (“My Little Lamb”), Davis paid tribute to his late father, shining a light on their complicated relationship (“The Day You Died”).

Finally, Davis’s Persian music studies in weekly Zoom lessons inspired him to integrate traditional Middle Eastern instruments such as the setar, oud, saz, and tombak. “Because we’re so separate, part of this album is me desperately trying to telepathically communicate to John and Scott, who are 700 miles away from me,” Barlow concludes. “A big part of what I consider to be the Folk Implosion is taking disparate things and turning them into pop.” 

“Moonlit Kind”
“Moonlit Kind” is the Folk Implosion’s bobbing, shimmering ode to night owls. Offering a glimpse into the mind of Barlow, who depicts himself as a bear “coming out of the cave,” the song describes his emotional waxes and wanes. Whether touching the sky or going low, he never unwinds… but always believes. With Middle Eastern instruments such as the setar, oud, saz, and tombak, Davis and producer Scott Solter (St. Vincent, Spoon, The Mountain Goats) send the song soaring, transforming Barlow’s words into nocturnal musical bliss.

“My Little Lamb/Bobblehead”
“My Little Lamb” is the Folk Implosion’s tough yet tender ode to parenthood. “That’s my first stab at articulating what it’s like being a dad,” Barlow explains. “I wanted it to include all of the light shit and all of the dark shit.” This flows into the infectiously catchy “Bobblehead.” Originally based on an intimate relationship where someone preferred to be propped up instead of listening to opposing perspectives, Davis rewrote the lyrics 15 years later to make them more broadly political. He describes the song as “Noam Chomsky’s Manufacturing Consent meets ‘Beautiful World’ by DEVO.”

The Folk Implosion

Lou Barlow

Lou Barlow has been among the most powerfully distinctive, influential, and prolific figures in independent music since the 1980s. He was a member of three important bands, Dinosaur Jr., Sebadoh, and the Folk Implosion, as well as making time for a solo career, and the common thread between his contributions to all these projects come from his gift for penning simple but memorable melodies, and his willingness to bare his soul and expose his insecurities. As a bassist, he took a supporting role in Dinosaur Jr., as the leader of Sebadoh he was a pivotal figure in the lo-fi revolution, and with the Folk Implosion he managed to land a single in the pop Top 40, 1995’s “Natural One.” Though his proper solo career didn’t begin until the 2000s, 2005’s Emoh and 2015’s Brace the Wave show he’s still in firm command of his style and his gifts
Although born in Dayton, Ohio, on July 17, 1966, Lou Barlow was raised primarily in Amherst, Massachusetts, where during high school he joined forces with fellow introverted outsider J Mascis in the hardcore band Deep Wound. After the group’s breakup in 1983, Barlow and Mascis reunited in Dinosaur (later Dinosaur Jr.), one of the most acclaimed indie bands of the era. Long-simmering tensions between Mascis and Barlow, who rarely spoke to each another, hastened the latter’s exit from the group after 1988’s superb Bug. After his dismissal, Barlow turned his focus to Sebadoh, a side project that he had begun with multi-instrumentalist Eric Gaffney several years prior. While Dinosaur Jr. had won acclaim for its monolithic guitar sound, Sebadoh was initially conceived as a bare-bones, deliberately low-fidelity home recording project spotlighting Barlow’s pensive, emotional songs and Gaffney’s noise collages. Over the course of a barrage of singles and sprawling albums like 1989’s The Freed Man, 1990’s Weed Forestin, and 1991’s Sebadoh III, Sebadoh — which later added drummer/songwriter Jason Loewenstein — matured and expanded its scope; while still defiantly anti-commercial, the group’s music grew more complex and fully developed, and moved progressively away from its primitive origins.
No doubt a reaction to Sebadoh’s growth, Barlow started the first of many concurrent side projects, dubbed Sentridoh, and released the Losers cassette in 1991. For all intents and purposes a solo project, Sentridoh allowed the staggeringly prolific performer room to explore not only his shambling acoustic folk-pop but also whatever other ideas he felt like entertaining. A series of other releases followed, most of them on cassette, although the highlights were compiled on CD collections like 1994’s Winning Losers: A Collection of Home Recordings, The Original Losing Losers, and Lou Barlow and His Sentridoh, which featured the sublime love song “Forever Instant.” Another Collection of Home Recordings, released under the name Lou Barlow & Friends and featuring Bob Fay (Gaffney’s replacement in Sebadoh), appeared in 1995.
In 1994, Barlow also teamed with fellow singer/songwriter John Davis in the Folk Implosion, another home-recording outlet (albeit one marked by odd stylistic detours into blue-eyed funk, Lennon-esque pop, and noise abrasion). Following a series of EPs and singles, in 1995 the Folk Implosion recorded a number of songs for filmmaker Larry Clark’s acclaimed feature Kids; the soundtrack’s infectious “Natural One” became a surprise Top 40 hit later that year, further raising Barlow’s increasingly high profile. After Sebadoh’s well-received 1996 LP Harmacy, Barlow recorded the Folk Implosion’s Dare to Be Surprised for release in the spring of 1997. Two more Folk Implosion albums, 1999’s One Part Lullaby and 2003’s The New Folk Implosion, appeared before the group announced their breakup, while Sebadoh had called it a day several months after the release of The Sebadoh in 1999.
Barlow pursued a solo career, releasing the albums Emoh (2005) and Goodnight Unknown (2009), while also recording and touring with Dinosaur Jr. who, to the surprise of many, reunited their original lineup and released 2007’s Beyond. Also in 2007, Sebadoh got back together for a series of live dates, and the band would return to the studio, cutting an EP (2012’s Secret) and an album (2013’s Defend Yourself). Despite his busy schedule, Barlow found time to cut another solo LP in 2015, Brace the Wave. He kept up the heady pace in 2016, contributing to the Elliott Smith tribute album Say Yes!, playing bass on the second Dumb Numbers album, collaborating with Dinosaur Jr. on the LP Give a Glimpse of What Yer Not, and releasing an acoustic EP, Apocalypse Fetish. Sebadoh returned to duty for the 2019 album Act Surprised, and Dinosaur Jr. made their way back into the studio to cut 2021’s Sweep It Into Space, but Barlow still found time in his schedule to make another solo effort, and Reason to Live was issued by Joyful Noise in May 2021.

Lou Barlow

John Davis

John Davis is a musician who works solo, with Folk Implosion, with a backing band called the Cicadas, and with Dennis Callaci. He also works on defending and transforming public education as a teacher – organizer with the Durham Association of Educators.

John Davis